The Ten Greatest Essays, Ever

John Berger

Italo Calvino, “Exactitude”

(from Six Memos for the Next Millenium, Harvard University Press, 1988)

Rebecca Solnit, “After Ideology”

(from Hope in the Dark, 2005)

Simone Weil, “Evil”

(from Gravity and Grace, 2002)

Arundhati Roy, “The Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire”

(from The Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire, 2004)

Iona Heath, “Ways of Dying”

(from Matters of Life and Death, 2007)

Maurice Merleau-Ponty, “Eye and Mind”

(from The Primacy of Perception, 1964)

Walter Benjamin, “On Language as Such and On the Language of Man”

(from One-Way Street, 1928)

D.H. Lawrence, “The Dance of the Sprouting Corn”

(from Mornings in Mexico, 1927)

George Orwell, “The Art of Donald McGill”

(from Collected Essays, 1941)

Soren Kierkegard, “The Immediate State of the Erotic”

(from Either/Or, 1843)

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About John Berger

John Berger is the author of 29 books, some of them novels, some of them essays, but the majority of them a fascinating mixture of both. Included among these are Into Their Labors, A Seventh Man, G., The Success and Failure of Picasso, Ways of Seeing, And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief as Photos, From A to X, and most recently the critically acclaimed fictional memoir Here Is Where We Meet. Berger has also written a number of screenplays, the most notable of which is Jonah who will be 25 in the year 2000, which was directed by the Swiss filmmaker Alain Tanner. Berger’s work has won the Man Booker Prize and a Lannan Literary Award for Lifetime Achievement, among many other honors. He lives in France.